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The Cases of the ‘Blue Balls’ & ‘Blue Vulva’: All the Facts You Should Know This 2023

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Interestingly, there are other ways to deal with “blues balls”, other than insisting on having sex.

The Cases of the 'Blue Balls' & 'Blue Vulva': All the Facts You Should Know This 2023
Cr.: Men’s health

As a lady, have you ever second-guessed making out with a guy and ended things abruptly? If you have, there is a high chance you’ve heard of the “blue balls”? (There’s also the “blue vulva” discussed later in this article) This term, referred to as epididymal hypertension, has been around for quite some time, but its origins are unclear. Some people say that it comes from the way the testicles look when they’re “backed up” with semen, while others believe it comes from the discolouration that can occur when blood flow is restricted. Regardless of its origin, the term has been used in popular culture for decades.

Perhaps the most famous reference to “blue balls” in popular culture comes from the 1994 comedy “There’s Something About Mary.” In the film, Ben Stiller’s character experiences a case of “blue balls” after a makeout session with Cameron Diaz’s character. The scene is played for laughs, but it’s worth noting that the condition is no laughing matter for those who experience it.

So, what exactly is the “blue balls”? 

The term refers to the discomfort or pain that some men experience when they’re sexually aroused but don’t ejaculate. This can occur during sexual activity, but it can also happen during other activities that cause sexual arousal, such as making out or watching porn.

The discomfort is caused by a build-up of blood in the testicles, which can cause them to feel heavy, achy, or even painful. The scrotum may also appear swollen or discoloured. While the discomfort and pain associated with “blue balls” can be very real and can cause anxiety or embarrassment for some men, it’s important to separate fact from fiction.

An article published by PubMed found that “blue balls” is not a medically recognised condition. And while there’s a medical term for it, there’s no evidence to suggest that it can cause any long-term harm. As a man, if you’re experiencing discomfort or pain in your testicles after sexual arousal, the best thing you can do is ejaculate. This will relieve the pressure and help to reduce the discomfort. You don’t necessarily need to be inside a woman to relieve yourself. If you’re not able to ejaculate for whatever reason, there are other things you can try. Taking a cold shower, applying a cold compress to the affected area, or doing some light exercise can all help to reduce discomfort and promote blood flow. 

Interestingly, this case of the morning isn’t restricted to men alone as women can also experience a similar sensation and it is known as the “blue vulva.” 

Let’s talk about the “blue vulva”.

gray scale photo of woman sitting on bed
Cr.: Unsplash/Richard Jaimes

It’s important to note that the term is not medically recognised and is used colloquially to describe the discomfort or pain that some women may experience after prolonged sexual arousal without orgasm. The sensation is caused by a build-up of blood in the genital area, which can cause the vulva to feel heavy, achy, or even painful. This can occur during sexual activity, but it can also happen during other activities that cause sexual arousal, such as kissing or watching porn.

Although “blue vulva” is not a medically recognised condition, it can cause real discomfort and anxiety for some women. The discomfort associated with the condition will usually go away on its own, and it won’t cause any long-term harm. If you’re experiencing discomfort or pain in your genital area after prolonged sexual arousal without orgasm, there are things you can do to alleviate the symptoms. One way to relieve the discomfort is to engage in sexual activity that leads to orgasm. Masturbation or sexual activity with a partner can also help to reduce this discomfort and promote blood flow in the genital area.

It’s important to remember that everyone’s experience with sexual arousal is different, and what works for one person may not work for another. If you’re experiencing discomfort or pain in your genital area and it’s causing you anxiety or embarrassment, it’s always a good idea to talk to a healthcare provider. They can help to rule out any underlying medical conditions and provide you with guidance on how to manage the discomfort.

The case of the blues has been an interesting journey of separating myth from reality when it comes to the phenomenon of “blue balls” and “blue vulva.” While the ideas may sound funny or even titillating, the reality is far from amusing. The discomfort and pain associated with these conditions can be very real and should not be trivialized. It’s important to remember that the causes of “blue balls” and “blue vulva” are not completely understood, and more research is needed to better understand these conditions. In the meantime, communication and understanding between sexual partners can go a long way in alleviating any potential discomfort.

So, let’s put the myths aside and focus on the facts. “Blue balls” and “blue vulva” are not just punchlines to a joke, but rather real conditions that can affect both men and women. By separating myth from reality and taking these conditions seriously, we can better care for ourselves and our partners in the bedroom.

And remember, as with many things in life, prevention is often the best medicine. So take the time to listen to your body and communicate with your partner, and you may just find yourself feeling a little less blue.

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